Oddjob 1.3 Released

This release would best be described as a ‘Consolidation Release’. The biggest improvements are under the hood and result in an Oddjob that runs much better but in an almost indiscernible way. There are however a few new and noteworthy features. These include:
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Feature Comparison of Java Job Schedulers – Plus One

Poor Oddjob, I thought as I read Craig Flichel’s Feature Comparison of Java Job Schedulers featuring Obsidian, Quartz, Cron4j and Spring. Yet again it hasn’t made the grade, it’s been passed over for the scheduling team.

Never mind I say, you’re just a little bit different and misunderstood. Let’s have a kick about in the back yard and see what you can do…
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Jobs And Services

Life is, and always has been, about executing a sequence of jobs – hunt mammoth, skin mammoth, cook mammoth, make clothes from mammoth. In the beginning an individual would have done all these jobs, but it didn’t take long for ancient societies to realise that it was more efficient for people to specialise in one type of job and to offer the product of that job as a service. Two hundred thousand years later we have McDonald’s and Gap. Whether this is progress is for you to decide – but it is undeniable that this model has allowed vastly complex systems of millions of components (us) to function and thrive.
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Oddjob With Spring

Spring is great for creating flexible applications by assembling loosely coupled components using XML. Here’s a simple Spring configuration file:

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
  xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
  xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans

http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.5.xsd">

  <bean id="hello" class="example.HelloWorldBean" />

</beans>

Except that now you have to go back to your context assisted IDE and write some Java to launch it!
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Oddjob 1.2 New Features – Part 1

It’s coming to that time again. That time where I draw a line in the README file and call it a release. Being the only developer on a project that doesn’t have a large user base, a release is really just a state of mind. Like the flying ants that decide on mass to pour forth from their nests without the aid of any social media – it becomes time for a release.
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